Tag Archives: seagulls

Summer is here

 

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  1. My  roots grow fast, when I love a place! This is certainly the case with Tenby, where I had the chance to live twice, in the same place (and, by the same token, plant my roots even deeper). I had difficulty leaving this magical place, its gulls larger than life and the Atlantic. But the thought of returning to the summer, of seeing the soft pastel colors of New Zealand, the turquoises of the Pacific, made the journey of return a little easier.

Disappointment on return, it was rather cold, it was raining and there was no sun. Then last Saturday, summer arrived.

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Scavengers*

 

 

 

 

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To continue reading….

 

 

 

 

Tenby has a difficult  relationship with gulls. Many posters ask visitors not to feed them  under any circumstances, as they do not shrink from anything for a piece of food. It is probably in this spirit that  a city (or a village) in Great Britain has recently  fined a woman who had shared a chip  with a gull. I suppose not  everyone shares this view of them.  The fishermen of the port do not seem to mind  their presence and they even throw on occasions  some fish remains. As for me, the gulls of Tenby are one of the reasons why I like to come here. I never tire of watching them at any time of day. They head towards the smallest sign  of what can look like food in a joyful, often cacophonous but lively concert. I continue to take pictures of them, in case this one or that one would be more interesting, and this, even if one of them one day attacked my sandwich. More recently, while I was walking on Tudor Square, a furious man rushed out of a shop shouting against the bird that had taken the fish he had just bought. Okay, they’re nasty, sometimes,  scavengers who are happy to eat anything. Doubtless they are useful in the port, while they cleanse, somehow, the place. And they do not always have an easy life. As  Angus, the storm, hit a part of the country a few days ago, the poor birds were trying to fight the wind (or work it)  in order to feed themselves on what they could find, but they could not, and I suppose that on that day  they simply fasted. It is true that they lack manners, but can they be reproached for not being able to tell the difference between the fish that comes from the fish shop from that floating on the surface of the waters?

*A different take on the same topic on 25th January 2015 “Gwelen”